PHYSICAL SIGNS OF ALCOHOLISM

Sponsored Links :

This article is about Physical Signs of Alcoholism. In this article we are trying to provide you good information about Physical Signs of Alcoholism. We have arranged the information in this post to make you understand it easily. We hope that you can understand it well. Please check the information below.

Physical Signs of Alcoholism

PHYSICAL SIGNS OF ALCOHOLISM

Short-term Effects

Drinking enough to cause a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.03–0.12% typically causes an overall improvement in mood and possible euphoria (a “happy” feeling), increased self-confidence and sociability, decreased anxiety, a flushed, red appearance in the face and impaired judgment and fine muscle coordination. A BAC of 0.09% to 0.25% causes lethargy, sedation, balance problems and blurred vision. A BAC from 0.18% to 0.30% causes profound confusion, impaired speech (e.g., slurred speech), staggering, dizziness and vomiting. A BAC from 0.25% to 0.40% causes stupor, unconsciousness, anterograde amnesia, vomiting (death may occur due to inhalation of vomit (pulmonary aspiration) while unconscious and respiratory depression (potentially life-threatening). A BAC from 0.35% to 0.80% causes a coma (unconsciousness), life-threatening respiratory depression and possibly fatal alcohol poisoning. With all alcoholic beverages, drinking while driving, operating an aircraft or heavy machinery increases the risk of an accident; many countries have penalties against drunk driving.

Long-term Effects

Drinking more than one drink a day for women or two drinks for men increases the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, atrial fibrillation, and stroke. Risk is greater in younger people due to binge drinking which may result in violence or accidents. About 3.3 million deaths (5.9% of all deaths) are believed to be due to alcohol each year. Alcoholism reduces a person’s life expectancy by around ten years and alcohol use is the third leading cause of early death in the United States. No professional medical association recommends that people who are nondrinkers should start drinking wine. Long-term alcohol abuse can cause a number of physical symptoms, including cirrhosis of the liver, pancreatitis, epilepsy, polyneuropathy, alcoholic dementia, heart disease, nutritional deficiencies, peptic ulcers and sexual dysfunction, and can eventually be fatal. Other physical effects include an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease, malabsorption, alcoholic liver disease, and cancer. Damage to the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system can occur from sustained alcohol consumption. A wide range of immunologic defects can result and there may be a generalized skeletal fragility, in addition to a recognized tendency to accidental injury, resulting a propensity to bone fractures.

Sponsored Links :

Women develop long-term complications of alcohol dependence more rapidly than do men. Additionally, women have a higher mortality rate from alcoholism than men. Examples of long-term complications include brain, heart, and liver damage and an increased risk of breast cancer. Additionally, heavy drinking over time has been found to have a negative effect on reproductive functioning in women. This results in reproductive dysfunction such as anovulation, decreased ovarian mass, problems or irregularity of the menstrual cycle, and early menopause. Alcoholic ketoacidosis can occur in individuals who chronically abuse alcohol and have a recent history of binge drinking. The amount of alcohol that can be biologically processed and its effects differ between sexes. Equal dosages of alcohol consumed by men and women generally result in women having higher blood alcohol concentrations (BACs), since women generally have a higher percentage of body fat and therefore a lower volume of distribution for alcohol than men, and because the stomachs of men tend to metabolize alcohol more quickly.

So that is all about Physical Signs of Alcoholism. We think that it is good information about Physical Signs of Alcoholism. We hope that this information is useful for you. Please share if you think that this information can be useful for others. If you need more article related to Physical Signs of Alcoholism you can simply subscribe this blog. Thanks for visiting and have a nice browsing.

Source:
Schuckit, MA (27 November 2014). “Recognition and management of withdrawal delirium (delirium tremens).”. The New England Journal of Medicine. 371 (22): 2109–13.
“Alcohol Facts and Statistics”. Retrieved 9 May 2015.
O’Keefe, JH; Bhatti, SK; Bajwa, A; DiNicolantonio, JJ; Lavie, CJ (March 2014). “Alcohol and cardiovascular health: the dose makes the poison … or the remedy.”. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 89 (3): 382–93.
Alcohol and Heart Health American Heart Association
American Medical Association (2003). Leiken, Jerrold B. MD; Lipsky, Martin S. MD, eds. Complete Medical Encyclopedia (Encyclopedia) (First ed.). New York, NY: Random House Reference. p. 485.
Müller D, Koch RD, von Specht H, Völker W, Münch EM (March 1985). “[Neurophysiologic findings in chronic alcohol abuse]”. Psychiatr Neurol Med Psychol (Leipz) (in German). 37 (3): 129–32.
Testino G (2008). “Alcoholic diseases in hepato-gastroenterology: a point of view”. Hepatogastroenterology. 55 (82–83): 371–7.
10th Special Report to the U.S. Congress on Alcohol and Health, 2000, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.
Blum, Laura N.; Nielsen, Nancy H.; Riggs, Joseph A.; Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association (September 1998). “Alcoholism and alcohol abuse among women: report of the council on scientific affairs”. Journal of Women’s Health. Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 7 (7): 861–870.
Walter H, Gutierrez K, Ramskogler K, Hertling I, Dvorak A, Lesch OM (November 2003). “Gender-specific differences in alcoholism: implications for treatment”. Archives of Women’s Mental Health. 6 (4): 253–8.
Mihai B, Lăcătuşu C, Graur M (April–June 2008). “[Alcoholic ketoacidosis]”. Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi. 112 (2): 321–6.
Sibaï K, Eggimann P (September 2005). “[Alcoholic ketoacidosis: not rare cause of metabolic acidosis]”. Rev Med Suisse. 1 (32): 2106, 2108–10, 2112–5
Cederbaum AI (2012). “Alcohol metabolism”. Clin Liver Dis. 16 (4): 667–85.
wikipedia.org

Leave a Reply