URINE AND BLOOD TEST FOR ALCOHOL

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Urine and Blood Test for Alcohol

There are reliable tests for the actual use of alcohol, one common test being that of blood alcohol content (BAC). These tests do not differentiate alcoholics from non-alcoholics; however, long-term heavy drinking does have a few recognizable effects on the body, including:

  • Macrocytosis (enlarged MCV)
  • Elevated GGT
  • Moderate elevation of AST and ALT and an AST: ALT ratio of 2:1
  • High carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT)

With regard to alcoholism, BAC is useful to judge alcohol tolerance, which in turn is sign of alcoholism.

However, none of these blood tests for biological markers is as sensitive as screening questionnaires.

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URINE AND BLOOD TEST FOR ALCOHOL

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References:
Association, American Psychiatric (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders : DSM-5. (5 ed.). Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Association. pp. 490–497. ISBN 9780890425541.
Jones AW (2006). “Urine as a biological specimen for forensic analysis of alcohol and variability in the urine-to-blood relationship”. Toxicol Rev. 25 (1): 15–35. doi:10.2165/00139709-200625010-00002. PMID 16856767.
Das SK, Dhanya L, Vasudevan DM (2008). “Biomarkers of alcoholism: an updated review”. Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 68 (2): 81–92. doi:10.1080/00365510701532662. PMID 17852805.

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